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Cell Phones & Kids

If you have a child of almost any age, as a parent, you have most likely heard this question, “Can I have a cell phone?”. Approximately 77% of kids ages 12-17 and 56% of kids ages 8-12 have cell phones. Parents are faced with a tough decision. It takes a fair amount of discipline and sense of responsibility to have a cell phone and most kids aren’t ready for that before middle school, and for some into high school. Cell phones are expensive and we worry that access to the internet may not always be safe and appropriate. Also, cell phones cause distractions in school and while driving. On the other hand, cell phones are a great way to communicate with your child, send reminders and help them in an emergency. And, even though we don’t want it to matter, “everyone else has one” can be one of the most important reasons to your child. Read More

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The Importance of Tummy Time

When your baby is lying on her stomach, she is able to practice lifting her head, preparing to be able to explore her world on her own. Tummy time is important because it allows babies to strengthen their back, neck, arms and legs. Strengthening these body parts, in turn, helps with development of rolling over and sitting. Tummy time also helps your baby prevent developing a flat spot on the back of her head. Read More

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Children and Concussions

When you hear the term concussion, it brings to mind someone losing consciousness while playing a sport. However, concussions can happen with any head injury and often without the loss of consciousness. In addition to being at risk from concussions when playing sports, children get concussions from car or bike accidents, falls, hitting their head or from a whip-lash type injury. Read More

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What's Wrong with the W Sit

The W position when sitting is a position that children may move in and out of when playing; however, when the W position is used frequently, children are limited their ability to strengthen their core and using rotation to cross midline. Also, children who frequently use the W position when sitting may develop orthopedic problems in the future. Read More

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What's Wrong with the W Sit

The W position when sitting is a position that children may move in and out of when playing; however, when the W position is used frequently, children are limited their ability to strengthen their core and using rotation to cross midline. Also, children who frequently use the W position when sitting may develop orthopedic problems in the future. Read More

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